Upper Body

Some cool body weight training images:

Upper Body
body weight training
Image by Billy Wilson Photography
© Billy Wilson 2011

A shot of my upper body while I’m doing a dumbbell shoulder press.

Well here’s the first thing I have shot in a while, my classes ended yesterday and I now have a week off to study and do whatever I want. So that means shoot. Organic chemistry is still putting quite a load on my shoulders. I hope to do some shoots with more models in the coming week so look for that. By the way, I didn’t enlarge any part of my body in the editing for this image, this is actually how I look when lifting in the correct lighting plus mid-tone contrast enhancements.

About the Photo
*Camera: Canon EOS Digital Rebel XS *Lens: EF 50mm ƒ/1.8 II *Shutter Speed: 1/200 Sec. *Aperture Value: ƒ/5.6 *ISO: 100 *Focal Length: 50mm (80mm Equivalent on 35mm Film)

I shot this on a tripod using mirror lockup and a remote switch along with a 10 second self timer so I could get into form with the dumbbells. This was quite the physical shoot since I had to lift those above my head for every shot, there’s more than 100 images taken of this pose. To the left of me I have a Canon Speedlite 430EX II being shot into a 60" Westcott reflective umbrella at an angle so the flash was pointed at the edge of the umbrella, this flash was around 3 feet away and at 1/2 power and at 105mm, it was gelled blue to create the cool colour temperature you see in the image. To the right of me I had a Vivitar at full power pointed directly at me around 4 feet away. Between the Speedlite and the wall I had a wall of diffusion pannels to create a flag between the flash and the wall so that light didn’t spill over onto it so my background would come out black. I trigged the Speedlite with a Canon ST-E2 wireless transmitter and the Vivitar was triggered optically. I edited the RAW file as a TIFF, did mid-tone contrast enhancements and removed spots on my skin and saved as an sRGB JPEG for internet display.

Please press "L" on your keyboard to see the image on black.

Jeep Willys
body weight training
Image by pedrosimoes7
Belem, Lisbon, Portugal

in Wikipedia

The Willys MB U.S. Army Jeep (formally the Truck, 1/4 ton, 4×4) and the Ford GPW were manufactured from 1941 to 1945. These small four-wheel drive utility vehicles are considered the iconic World War II Jeep, and inspired many similar light utility vehicles. Over the years, the World War II Jeep later evolved into the "CJ" civilian Jeep. Its counterpart in the German army was the Volkswagen Kübelwagen, first prototyped in 1938, also based on a small automobile, but which used an air-cooled engine and was not four-wheel drive.

Contents

Even though the world had seen widespread mechanisation of the military during World War I, and the United States Army had already used four-wheel drive trucks in it, supplied by the Four Wheel Drive Auto Co. (FWD), by the time World War II was dawning, the United States Department of War were still seeking a light, cross-country reconnaissance vehicle.
As tensions were heightening around the world in the late 1930s, the U.S. Army asked American automobile manufacturers to tender suggestions to replace its existing, aging light motor vehicles, mostly motorcycles and sidecars but also some Ford Model Ts.[2][3] This resulted in several prototypes being presented to army officials, such as five Marmon-Herrington 4×4 Fords in 1937, and three Austin roadsters by American Bantam in 1938 (Fowler, 1993). However, the U.S. Army’s requirements were not formalized until July 11, 1940, when 135 U.S. automotive manufacturers were approached to submit a design conforming to the army’s specifications for a vehicle the World War II technical manual TM 9-803 described as "… a general purpose, personnel, or cargo carrier especially adaptable for reconnaissance or command, and designated as 1/4-ton 4×4 Truck."

Marmon-Herrington converted Ford 1/2 ton truck, sometimes called the "Grandfather of the Jeep"

By now the war was under way in Europe, so the Army’s need was urgent and demanding[citation needed]. Bids were to be received by July 22, a span of just eleven days. Manufacturers were given 49 days to submit their first prototype and 75 days for completion of 70 test vehicles. The Army’s Ordnance Technical Committee specifications were equally demanding: the vehicle would be four-wheel drive, have a crew of three on a wheelbase of no more than 75 (later 80) inches and tracks no more than 47 inches, feature a fold-down windshield, 660 lb payload and be powered by an engine capable of 85 ft·lb (115 N·m) of torque. The most daunting demand, however, was an empty weight of no more than 1,300 lb (590 kg).

Only two companies entered: American Bantam Car Company and Willys-Overland Motors. Though Willys-Overland was the low bidder, Bantam received the bid, being the only company committing to deliver a pilot model in 49 days and production examples in 75. Under the leadership of designer Karl Probst, Bantam built their first prototype, dubbed the "Blitz Buggy" (and in retrospect "Old Number One"), and delivered it to the Army vehicle test center at Camp Holabird, Maryland on September 23, 1940. This presented Army officials with the first of what eventually evolved into the World War II U.S. Army Jeeps: the Willys MB and Ford GPW.

The Bantam no.1 ‘Blitz Buggy’

Since Bantam did not have the production capacity or fiscal stability to deliver on the scale needed by the War Department, the other two bidders, Ford and Willys, were encouraged to complete their own pilot models for testing. The contract for the new reconnaissance car was to be determined by trials. As testing of the Bantam prototype took place from September 27 to October 16, Ford and Willys technical representatives present at Holabird were given ample opportunity to study the vehicle’s performance. Moreover, in order to expedite production, the War Department forwarded the Bantam blueprints to Ford and Willys, claiming the government owned the design. Bantam did not dispute this move due to its precarious financial situation. By November 1940, Ford and Willys each submitted prototypes to compete with the Bantam in the Army’s trials. The pilot models, the Willys Quad and the Ford Pygmy, turned out very similar to each other and were joined in testing by Bantam’s entry, now evolved into a Mark II called the BRC 60. By then the U.S. and its armed forces were already under such pressure that all three cars were declared acceptable and orders for 1,500 units per company were given for field testing. At this time it was acknowledged the original weight limit (which Bantam had ignored) was unrealistic, and it was raised to 2,160 pounds (980 kg).

For these respective pre-production runs, each vehicle received revisions and a new name. Bantam’s became the BRC 40, and the company ceased motor vehicle production after the last one was built in December 1941. After reducing the vehicle’s weight by 240 pounds, Willys’ changed the designation to "MA" for "Military" model "A". The Fords went into production as "GP", with "G" for a "Government" type contract and "P" commonly used by Ford to designate any passenger car with a wheelbase of 80 inches.[4]

Willys MA jeep at the Desert Training Center, Indio, California, June 1942

Willys MB used by former Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay

By July 1941, the War Department desired to standardize and decided to select a single manufacturer to supply them with the next order for another 16,000 vehicles. Willys won the contract mostly due to its more powerful engine (the "Go Devil") which soldiers raved about, and its lower cost and silhouette. The design features the Bantam and Ford entries had which were an improvement over Willys’ were then incorporated into the Willys car, moving it from an "A" designation to "B", thus the "MB" nomenclature. Most notable was a flat wide hood, adapted from Ford GP.

By October 1941, it became apparent Willys-Overland could not keep up with production demand and Ford was contracted to produce them as well. The Ford car was then designated GPW, with the "W" referring to the "Willys" licensed design. During World War II, Willys produced 363,000 Jeeps and Ford some 280,000. Approximately 51,000 were exported to the U.S.S.R. under the Lend-Lease program.

A further 13,000 (roughly) amphibian jeeps were built by Ford under the name GPA (nicknamed ‘Seep’ for Sea Jeep). Inspired by the larger DUKW, the vehicle was produced too quickly and proved to be too heavy, too unwieldy, and of insufficient freeboard. In spite of participating successfully in the Sicily landings (July 1943) most GPAs were routed to the U.S.S.R. under the Lend-Lease program. The Soviets were sufficiently pleased with its ability to cross rivers to develop their own version of it after the war, the GAZ-46.
Origin of the term "jeep"[edit]

Main article: The origin of the term "jeep"

One account of the origin of the term "jeep" begins when the prototypes were being proven at military bases. The term "jeep" was used by Army mechanics for any untried or untested vehicles.[5]
Although most likely due to a bastardization of the acronym "GP", used to designate the vehicle, another likely factor in the popularization of the jeep name came from the fact that the vehicle made quite an impression on soldiers at the time, so much so that they informally named it after Eugene the Jeep, a character in the Popeye comic strip and cartoons created by E. C. Segar as early as mid-March of 1936. Eugene the Jeep was Popeye’s "jungle pet" and was "small, able to move between dimensions and could solve seemingly impossible problems."
In early 1941, Willys-Overland staged a press event in Washington, D.C., having the car demonstrate its prowess by driving up the Capitol steps. Irving "Red" Hausmann, a test driver on the Willys development team who had accompanied the car for its testing at Camp Holabird, had heard soldiers there referring to it as a jeep. He was enlisted to go to the event and give a demonstration ride to a group of dignitaries, including Katherine Hillyer, a reporter for the Washington Daily News. When asked by the reporter, Hausmann too called it a Jeep. Hillyer’s article appeared in the newspaper on February 20, 1941, with a photo showing a jeep going up the Capitol steps and a caption including the term ‘jeep’. This is believed to be the most likely cause of the term being fixed in public awareness. Even though Hausmann did not create or invent the word Jeep, he very well could be the one most responsible for its first news media usage.

Photostat facsimile of the 1941 article

Photostat facsimile of Red Hausmann’s jeep being demonstrated for the reporter

Willys MB (US Army)

Willys in a museum

Grille[edit]

Willys made its first 25,000 MB Jeeps with a welded flat iron "slat" radiator grille. It was Ford who first designed and implemented the now familiar and distinctive stamped, slotted steel grille into its cars, which was lighter, used fewer resources, and was less costly to produce. Along with many other design features innovated by Ford, this was adopted by Willys and implemented into the standard World War II Jeep by April 1942.

Today, Jeep makers proudly retain the automobile’s historical connection to the visage of its predecessors by using a trademarked grille featuring a standard number of vertical openings or ‘slots’. However, in order to be able to get theirs trademarked, Willys gave their post-war jeeps seven slots instead of Ford’s nine-slot design. Through a series of corporate take-overs and mergers, AM General Corporation ended up with the rights to use the seven-slot grille as well, which they in turn extended to Chrysler when it acquired American Motors Corporation, then manufacturer of Jeep, in 1987.

Postwar

After the war Ford unsuccessfully sued Willys for the rights to the term "Jeep", leaving Willys with full rights to the name.[6] From 1945 onwards, Willys took its four-wheel drive vehicle to the public with its CJ (Civilian Jeep) versions, making these the first mass-produced 4×4 civilian vehicles. In 1948, US Federal Trade Commission agreed with American Bantam, that the idea of creating the Jeep was originated and developed by the American Bantam in collaboration with some US Army officers. The commission forbade Willys from claiming directly or by implication, that it created or designed the Jeep, and allowed it only to claim, that it contributed to the development of the vehicle.[5] However, American Bantam went bankrupt by 1950, and Willys was granted the "Jeep" trademark in 1950.
The first CJs were essentially the same as the MB, except for such alterations as vacuum-powered windshield wipers, a tailgate (and therefore a side-mounted spare tire), and civilian lighting. Also, the civilian jeeps had amenities like naugahyde seats, chrome trim, and were available in a variety of colors. Mechanically, a heftier T-90 transmission replaced the Willys MB’s T84 in order to appeal to the originally considered rural buyers demographic.
Willys-Overland and its successors, Willys Motors and Kaiser Jeep supplied the U.S. military as well as many allied nations with military jeeps through the late 1960s.

Dutch Army M38A1

M606 in Colombia

In 1950, the first postwar military jeep, the M38 (or MC), was launched, based on the 1949 CJ-3A. In 1953, it was quickly followed by the M38A1 (or MD), featuring an all-new "round-fendered" body in order to clear the also new, taller, Willys Hurricane engine. This jeep was later developed into the CJ-5 launched in 1955. Similarly, its ambulance version, the M170 (or MDA), featuring a 20-inch wheelbase stretch, was later turned into the civilian CJ-6.
Before the CJ-5, Willys offered the public a cheaper alternative with the taller F-head engine in the form of the CJ-3B, a CJ-3A body with a taller hood. This was quickly turned into the M606 jeep (mostly used for export, through 1968) by equipping it with the available heavy-duty options such as larger tires and springs, and by adding black-out lighting, olive drab paint, and a trailer hitch. After 1968, M606A2 and -A3 versions of the CJ-5 were created in a similar way for friendly foreign governments.

Licenses to produce CJ-3Bs were issued to manufacturers in many different countries, and some, such as the Mahindra corporation in India, continue to produce them in some form or another to this day. The French army, for instance, produced its Willys MB by buying the Willys license to enable the manufacture of their Hotchkiss M201.
The World War II Jeep inspired many imitations. Creations from competing manufacturers such as Land Rover, Toyota, Nissan, Mitsubishi, Suzuki, and a few others all owe their beginnings in the 4×4 world to the inspiration of the Willys Jeep.
The compact military jeep continued to be used in the Korean and Vietnam Wars. In Korea, it was mostly deployed in the form of the MB, as well as the M38 and M38A1 (introduced in 1952 and 1953), its direct descendants. In Vietnam, the most used jeep was the then newly designed Ford M151 MUTT, which featured such state-of-the-art technologies as a unibody construction and all around independent suspension with coil-springs. Apart from the mainstream of—by today’s standards—relatively small jeeps, an even smaller vehicle was developed for the US Marines, suitable for airlifting and manhandling, the M422 ‘Mighty Mite’.

Eventually, the U.S. military decided on a fundamentally different concept, choosing a much larger vehicle that not only took over the role of the jeep, but also replaced all other light military wheeled vehicles: the HMMWV ("Humvee").

In 1991, the Willys-Overland Jeep MB was designated an International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Image from page 302 of “From the Earth to the Moon direct in ninety-seven hours and twenty minutes, and a trip round it” (1874)
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Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: fromearthtomoond00vern
Title: From the Earth to the Moon direct in ninety-seven hours and twenty minutes, and a trip round it
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors: Verne, Jules, 1828-1905
Subjects:
Publisher: New York : Scribner, Armstrong
Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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Text Appearing Before Image:
tain, and inspace bodies fall or move (which is the same thing) Avith equalspeed whatever be their weight or form; it is the air, which by itsresistance creates these differences in weight. When you create avacuum in a tube, the objects you send through it, grains of dustor grains of lead, fall with the same rapidity. Here in space is thesame cause and the same effect. Just so, said NichoU, and everything we throw out of theprojectile will accompany it until it reaches the moon. Ah! fools that we are ! exclaimed Michel. Why that expletive ? asked Barbicane. Because we might have filled the projectile with usefulobjects, books, instruments, tools, &c. We could have thrownthem all out, and all would have followed in our train. Buthappy thought ! Why cannot we Avalk outside like the meteor ?Why cannot we launch into space through the scuttle ? Whatenjoyment it would be to feel oneself thus suspended in ether,more favoured than the birds who must use their wings to keepthemselves up I

Text Appearing After Image:
IT WAS THE BODY OF SATELLITE. [p. 201.] QUESTION AND ANSWER. 201 Granted, said Barbicane, but how to breathe ? Hang the air, to fail so inopportunely ! But if it did not fail, Michel, your density being less thanthat of the projectile, you would soon be left behind. Then wo must remain in our car ? We must! Ah ! exclaimed Michel, in a loud voice. What is the matter, asked NichoU. I know, I guess, what this pretended meteor is ! It is noasteroid which is accompanying us ! It is not a piece of a planet. What is it then ? asked Barbicane. It is our unfortunate dog ! It is Dianas husband ! Indeed, this deformed, unrecognizable object, reduced to nothing,was the body of SateUite, flattened like a bagpipe without wind,and ever mounting, mounting 1 202 ROUND THE MOON. CHAPTER VII. A MOMENT OP INTOXICATION. Thus a phenomenon, curious but explicable, was happening underthese strange conditions. Every object thrown from the projectile would follow the samecourse and never stop until it did. The

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Get Fit Today To Better Your Life Tomorrow

The definition of fitness is being physically sound and healthy. Being physically fit will enhance both your physical and mental quality of life. Read the tips below if you’re someone looking to get in shape.

Buying new clothes to wear while working out can give you a nice boost of confidence when you’re exercising. Even if you just buy one part of the workout outfit, it will still be a great motivator to get you to the gym.

Plant a garden of your own. It can be surprising to most people how much work is actually involved in gardening. Not only do you have to squat when gardening, but you also need to weed and dig. Gardening is only one hobby you can take up to stay in shape.

Think about becoming a member of a gym, and to motivate yourself to keep going, pay for several months at once. Ideally, you’ll get to the gym more often in order to keep your investment from going to waste. Fitness clubs are expensive and should only be used if your budget allows.

Stay motivated by setting personal fitness goals. Having something to focus on can help you avoid obsessing over how hard it is. Having a goal discourages thoughts of quitting and will keep you motivated to continue on with your fitness program.

When you exercise, remember to exhale after each repetition. This will let your body put out more energy while allowing you to get more oxygen into your blood. By doing this, you get more energy down the road.

Check out a few different fitness classes. Constantly trying new classes will help you find those you can stick with long term and lets you get your money’s worth out of your gym membership. Try out yoga or dancing. Other programs to consider include kickboxing or fitness boot camps. Just try and stay active and try new things out, you never know what you might enjoy.

Personal Trainer

If you’re dedicated to getting in shape, consider hiring a personal trainer. Your personal trainer will give you ideas on what to do to stay with your workout regime. Personal trainers can be an excellent tool.

Try to take on exercises that you do not prefer. It is believed that people tend not to do exercises in which they perform poorly. Focus on forcing yourself to complete even your most dreaded exercise routines.

Sit ups and crunches are not all you need for 6 pack abs. Although these exercises strengthen your abdominal muscles, they will not burn belly fat. You will have diet and do a cardio routine along with the exercises in order to get rid of the fat covering those washboard abs.

Muscle Mass

Extra repetitions goes a long way in improving your overall muscle mass during a lifting session. Muscle mass is is not built solely by lifting large amounts of weight; endurance is also key. The best lifters keep that in mind.

Don’t work out if you have a fever, chest congestion or are nauseous. When you’re ill, your body will try to heal itself using all of your body’s available resources. Your body can’t effectively build muscle and fight off an illness at the same time. So, halt your workouts until you have recovered. While you are waiting, get plenty of rest and eat well.

Do box squats to increase the size of your quadriceps. Box squats really help you gain that extra push of power you need when doing squats. If you find a sturdy box to exercise with, you can do box squats. Perform regular squats, but when your posterior touches the chair, hold your position for a moment.

As stated in the article above, it’s possible achieve a great level of fitness you will be able to be proud of. Don’t be ashamed of your body any longer. Your goals for getting fit will be within your grasp if you make use of the advice outlined here.